Valley of Fruitfulness

Following is a fantastic devotional piece by Francis Frangipane. It’s a little longer than usual, but keep reading; you’ll be blessed!

“The battles we face are often intense times of weakness, distress, and confusion. If the events of our lives were charted, these would be the lowest points. Yet God is no less with us during difficulties than at other times. In fact, these valleys are often as much the plan of God as our mountaintop experiences. There is a story in the Bible that speaks plainly to this truth. Israel had recently defeated the Arameans in a mountain battle. In 1 Kings, chapter 20, we read:

“Then the prophet came near to the king of Israel and said to him, ‘Go, strengthen yourself and observe and see what you have to do; for at the turn of the year the king of Aram will come up against you.’ Now the servants of the king of Aram said to him, ‘Their gods are gods of the mountains, therefore they were stronger than we; but rather let us fight against them in the plain, and surely we shall be stronger than they'” (1 Kings 20:22-23).

The enemy said that the God of Israel was a god of the mountains, but if they fought the Jews in the valleys they would defeat them. We read in verse 28: “Then a man of God came near and spoke to the king of Israel and said, ‘Thus says the Lord, “Because the Arameans have said, ‘The Lord is a god of the mountains, but He is not a god of the valleys,’ therefore, I will give all this great multitude into your hand, and you shall know that I am the Lord”‘” (1 Kings 20:28).

No matter what the enemy tries to tell you, Christ is God of the mountains and He is God of the valleys. He has not stopped being God because you happen to be in a valley. He is the God of glory as seen in His power and miracles. In the valleys He reveals Himself as faithful, loyally committed to us in our difficulties and distresses. In and through all things He is our God. When we are on the “mountaintops” of our Christian experience, we can see our future clearly. We have perspective and confidence. When we are in one of life’s valleys, however, our vision is limited and our future seems hidden. Yet valleys are also the most fertile places on earth. Valleys produce fruitfulness. You can expect there to be a harvest of virtue when God dwells with you in the valleys of life.

Consider Joseph

How blessed is the man whose strength is in You, in whose heart are the highways to Zion! Passing through the valley of Baca [weeping] they make it a spring… Psalm 84:5-6

Has the enemy isolated you, causing you to doubt God’s love? Do not forget, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Even the hairs on your head are numbered. He cares. It is His love for us that redeems our hardships, which not only brings good out of what was meant for evil but also trains us to deliver others. Consider Joseph. He was the second youngest of Jacob’s sons and his father’s favorite. His walk with God began with dreams and visions. Joseph’s life is a pattern for many who have had a genuine call from God. Our walk with God may also have begun with a “travel brochure” of dreams and visions where God gives us a picture of His destination for us. What we fail to be able to see is how His promises will come to pass in our lives.

Joseph was betrayed by his brothers and delivered up by them to die. He was unjustly accused when Potiphar’s wife tried to seduce him. He was imprisoned and forgotten by all except God, who was patiently watching and measuring Joseph’s reactions to difficulty. Rich or poor, blessed or smitten, regardless of his circumstances, Joseph served God. He continued to pass his tests. Joseph was on trial before men, but he was found innocent before God. Finally, at the right moment, the Lord suddenly connected all the loose ends of Joseph’s life. Everything that he went through, as unfair as each thing was, God used to shape him for Heaven’s purpose.

God alone sees the future and how the promises He gives us will unfold. Our task is to lay hold of Christ’s integrity and keep faith in what God has promised. Just as He allowed Joseph to go through many trials, so He allows us to go through great conflicts as well. For He knows that our lives, tested as they are, will help others find the shelter of the Most High in their lives.

“Joseph named the firstborn Manasseh, ‘For,’ he said, ‘God has made me forget all my trouble and all my father’s household'” (Genesis 41:51). God caused Joseph to forget the difficulty and pain of his life. There is something wonderful about the Lord’s capacity to cause all things to work for good. With Jesus in our lives, a time ultimately comes when God causes us to forget all the troubles of the past.

“He named the second Ephraim, ‘For,’ he said, ‘God has made me fruitful in the land of my affliction'” (Genesis 41:52).

God made Joseph fruitful in the very land of his affliction – and in the land of your affliction, in your battle, is the place where God will make you fruitful. Ultimately, the Lord will touch many others with the substance of what you have gained. In a world that is superficial, Christ will produce something in you that is deep and living. God has not promised to keep us from valleys and sufferings, but He has promised to make us fruitful in them. Without a doubt we each will pass through valleys before we reach our final goal in God. As we remain faithful to Him in trials, the character and nature of Christ Jesus will emerge in our lives.

Lord, You are God of the mountains and the valleys. I know that Your faithfulness is my shield and my bulwark. Thank You for redeeming the conflicts of my life; I praise You for healing me and causing me to forget all the trauma of my past. Now, Lord, help me now to help others as well.”

(c) 2013 Francis Frangipane. Used with permission. Find more articles by Francis Frangipane at

http://francisfrangipanemessages.blogspot.com/     http://www.arrowbookstore.com/

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